Archive for the ‘(BACK TO TOP)’ Category

You Raise Me Up, GWMC Choir, Guelph

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You Raise Me Up, Rolf Lovland

In a break in my schedule last week, I had the pleasure of attending the Guelph-Wellington Men’s Club Choir up in Guelph – it was a gorgeous day, and it felt great to hit the open road and play hookey for the afternoon. I knew that I was in for a treat, having attended the GWMC Spring Luncheon performance a couple years back, when I actually joined in for a spontaneous rendition of Moe Koffman’s Swingin’ Shepherd Blues, the recording of which is buried somewhere on my hard-drive!

You Raise Me Up, set at least in part to the tune of Danny Boy, was the closing number for their eclectic and delightful program which included the music of Thomas Morley, Harry Belafonte, along with such classics as Elvis Presley’s Jail House Rock and Irving Berlin’s Easter Parade.

Great job guys, and thanks again, Dad!

Subterranean Bloor Street

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Not far from the Glen Road bridge described in the previous couple of posts there is another interesting space, this one relatively public and respectable!

If ever you’ve driven west along Bloor towards the Danforth, you’ve unwittingly passed over this very tunnel, which can be easily accessed steps from the TTC’s Sherbourne Station. This magical tunnel truly links opposite worlds, and has a satisfying and lingering acoustic besides!

Passing through this space from south you leave behind a teeming and vibrant neighbourhood, replete with boarded up Century-homes and rich with ethnic diversity.  As you emerge on the north side there is a stunning footbridge that spans a deep ravine, and, scant seconds away, one is enfolded into the tree-lined streets of Rosedale, one of Toronto’s most affluent neighbourhoods.

Talk about a study in contrasts!

Mystical Satie in Toronto’s Ravines

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Erik Satie, Gnossienne #1

As you listen you may be wondering, but, no, my friend Steven and I did not drag a piano in under the bridge here, though that might have actually been kinda fun!

Sure, the defining element for my Urban Flute Project is offering a visual representation of the actual space you are listening to, but this is one of the rare exceptions, so I hope that you will indulge me – in this case I couldn’t resist putting together this image and music that seemed so perfect for one another!

I still had the music of Satie rattling around in my head as I came from rehearsal and wandered into the hidden Rosedale world as described in the previous post. While I reviewed photos from that afternoon, I realized that by chance this startling graffiti goes very nicely with the exotic mysticism of Satie’s Gnossiennes! I would credit the graffiti-artist, but I didn’t see a tag to identify who it might be…

It was great to be re-united with Satie’s music, the Gnossiennes in particular, penned back in the 1890’s. As much as I enjoy the Gymnopedies contained in the same folio, I find they tend to be over-played. These two sets of pieces are like day and night, with the Gnossiennes so mystical and illuminating, wonderfully wide open for interpretation. Written originally for solo piano, any of these pieces adapt nicely for flute and keyboard, with the flute taking the upper line in the music.

Here is the score so that you can print it off and follow along, or better yet even try it yourself – a kazoo or humming to yourself counts! The challenge for any instrument is to strike up a balance between sustaining the hec out of the melodic line versus conveying the ‘attack and decay’ of the piano original – listen for how some of my long notes have a bell-like tone, strong at the beginning and gradually diminishing to blend in with the syncopated harmonies of the piano, as I try to retain the texture of the music as it was originally intended. And of course, piano can’t employ vibrato, so that must also be handled with a certain discretion.

Satie’s quirky suggestions that he inserts into the score offer another layer of musical ambiguity with directives such as Shining, Questioning and, my favorite, On the Tip of the Tongue for the final phrase!

For more images from this evocative space hidden away under one of Toronto’s Rosedale bridges, check out the slideshow here.

Rosedale Underworld

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Debussy, Syrinx

Inspired by the late afternoon sun and glorious spring weather as I cycled back from rehearsal in Rosedale last weekend, on a whim I revisited this mysterious recording location that I had discovered about a year ago that’s hidden beneath a massive bridge right in the heart of this historic Toronto neighbourhood.

One of several impressive bridges that span the network of ravines in the area, the natural amphitheater created by it is made that much more compelling with the imposing graffiti and a couple of makeshift beds set up discreetly by some of Hogtown’s homeless.

The forlorn, abject solitude of the place seemed well-suited for Debussy’s classic and evocative Syrinx, written in 1913.

Watershed h2o Symposium at Metro Hall

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North American Flute Improv

The Council of Canadians held a symposium on water management down at Metro Hall earlier today, a watershed event where H2O specialists from Hamilton, Toronto and Simcoe County were given a chance to pool their ideas before a rapt audience thirsty for information.

This site may be called Urban Flute project, but without consideration of rural roots, our cities are sunk!

Serious environmental issues were bantered about, underscoring the dire need for establishing a National Policy pertaining to one of Canada’s most precious and embattled resources. Without federal legislation, water tables in Southern Ontario, Manitoba and other regions of Canada could be ruthlessly depleted in any number of provincial cash-grab scenarios.

If you consider that water is fast becoming the oil of our time, your attention to H2O issues are of paramount importance. Outcomes from today’s symposium? Create a veritable tsunami of solidarity demanding that the federal government address this pressing issue.

ideaCity10 in the WTF Building

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Paul Horn, Mumtaz Mahal

I have heard rumours of Moses Znaimer’s ideaCity swirling for some time now, and no surprise since the visionary conference marked its 10th anniversary last spring. Akin to the Creative Places + Spaces conference that I attended and covered as a live media blogger recently, ideaCity10 boasts a lineup of presenters that push the envelope in all aspects of contemporary urban thinking.

Dropping off a CD to the ideaCity offices took me east along Queen Street to a this historic building just near River Street, a property renovated by WTF Group. Heading up to the top floor, I reveled in the airy atrium-like lobby and found myself chomping at the bit to test what surely would be quite lovely acoustics.

And I wasn’t disappointed.

Setting my Edirol on record, I discreetly assembled my flute and launched into a composition by one of my fav composers, Paul Horn. Somehow the M’s and Z’s in the title of this work seemed apt given the fact that it was Mr. Znaimer who was the attended recipient of my Urban Flute CD! Talk about serendipity, this creative process has been rife with odd, even humorous coincidence! Case in point, it was just by chance that I had a chance to meet Mr. Znaimer late last year on Staten Island of all places, while we were both attending Gadgetoff09.

Mumtaz Mahal was first performed by Paul Horn as an improvisation, recorded live in the Taj Mahal.

After successfully locating the ideaCity offices and having a pleasant discussion with staff, I was unlocking my bike afterwards when I noticed the signage out front.

Asking someone who was grabbing a cigarette out on the sidewalk what WTF stood for, and we both puzzled over it. It turns out that WTF is a leading group of property owners who specialize in transforming historic buildings in Toronto.

I’m not sure what the letters stand for, but WTF, how perfect is that?

Everyone Loves a Parade

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Bagpipes, St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Happy Saint Pattie’s Day from Urban Flute Project!

While attending the annual OSSTF convention as described in the previous post, I happened to catch part of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade that rolled right by the Sheraton Hotel where I was stationed for the weekend. I wouldn’t have guessed that staging the parade was in the AMPA budget but it was worth every penny and my thanks to whoever coordinated this festive lunch-time diversion for us conference-goers ; )

I didn’t spot Curly in these pipers’ midsts, but towards the end of this soundfile you can hear the music fade into the distance as they round the corner at University and Queen where he can often be heard playing his solo pipes.

Thanks, Allyson, for sending along this great pic!

Mystical Toronto

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Hovhaness, Sonata (3rd mvt)

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Here’s another sonic sampling from last week’s Open Telescopes night as described in the previous post.

The meditative, mystical music of Alan Hovhaness seemed perfect to go along with this magical view of Toronto from the open air rooftop terrace and as visitors peered into the heavens through University of Toronto’s urban telescopes.

Hope to see you at the next free Public Tour on Thursday April 1st @ 9pm!

Beatbox and Shakuhachi

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Beatbox n Shakuhachi

Thanks to those who dropped by last Thursday evening for U of T’s Open Telescopes night, especially the guys who offered up some beatboxing while I played my Shakuhachi!

After the free public lecture that took a whimsical look at debunking various doomsday scenarios of some meteorite or other slamming into planet Earth in the year 2012, everyone was pretty pumped to get a glimpse of Saturn and these distinctive rings – you might even be able to make out Titan as a tiny speck just off to the left of our solar system’s second largest planet in this image taken with my Lumix 3 camera through one of the two 1950’s era massive scopes.

Along with members of Urban Flute Ensemble, I enjoy providing music every month as visitors excitedly ascend the final stairs to the uppermost floor of the McLennan Physical Labs Building near College and St. George Streets and queue up in the darkened, domed viewing rooms.

As one visitor commented, hearing my Shakuhachi playing in the background this last time provided half of the ambiance as they waited in line, the sounds of my traditional Japanese flute combined with the excitement of the evening causing them to forget where they were and get lost in the moment: mission accomplished!

For a little audience participation, I noticed a few guys hanging out who had some beatbox sounds going as they waited for their parents to finish looking through the telescopes, so I suggested that we try a little beatbox ‘n’ flute, you know, a la Greg Patillo! You can hear how hard it was for them to keep a straight face, but we had some fun rocking out in the reverberant space.

Open Telescopes takes place on the first Thursday of very month, and has definitely become a popular all ages event. Having partnered up with U of T for almost two years now (playing for Timbits I might add!) what was initially one of Toronto’s best kept secrets has morphed into a multi-generational and multi-cultural event with almost 200 people showing up – there’s nothing like peering skyward and reminding ourselves just how massive and mysterious the known universe is to unify humanity!

Urban Flute in one guise or another will be there at the next Open Telescopes scheduled for Thursday, April 1st, and if you can’t wait that long, there’s an open house Earth Hour 2010 where you can enjoy panoramic views of a darkened downtown Toronto and look through the telescopes if the weather cooperates.

For more information, check out U of T’s Astronomy and Astrophysics website here.

Quiet Day on the Markets

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Hovhaness, Sonata (Mvt. #2)

For quite some time now I’ve imagined myself playing flute on the floor of the Toronto Stock Exchange, you know, with the sound of money-transactions over morning coffees and the opening bell in the background. I still haven’t had my chance, but with some business brewing at the Richard Ivey School, you might say that I’m getting warmer.

It turns out that the acclaimed London-based Ivey School’s Toronto office – where I met recently with some Executive MBA participants – is located in the TSE building right on the corner of King & York – Urban Flute Project may not be listed on the TSX as of yet, but I’ll keep you posted!

This is the scene in the main lobby, and to avoid making a scene I chose not to set up right in front of this security desk – it felt daring enough to simply snap this picture – and instead I elected to capture a soundfile or two just around the corner from these three impressive Charles Pachter canvasses.

Renowned for his whimsical yet penetrating portraits of Queen Elizabeth straddling iconic moose, this Pachter triptych is a Canadian moment if I ever there was one.

It was far from quiet that day as you can hear from this recording of some solo flute by American composer Alan Hovhaness, so the title of this post might strike you as a tad confusing.

But compared to a year ago when all hell broke loose with the international markets on March 8th, I’d say that it was downright peaceful!

Union Station Fantasia

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Telemann, Fantasia #3

In case you haven’t been down near Union Station recently, long awaited construction has begun in earnest.

With a much talked about makeover, the erection of some pretty impressive hoarding seems to suggest that renos on the historic site and massive transit hub are finally getting underway.

I love how the sounds of construction in the background almost breathes with the music, especially as the first notes sound – it’s almost as if this Fantasia for Solo Flute were scored for flute and percussion!

Sure, I make a couple of flubs, but, like a lot of my recordings, this is a quick one-off as much to capture the unique acoustics of this wonderful lofted space, so I hope you can roll with joke! There’s a short break as I talk briefly with a couple of passers by, and then I carry on with the final movement.

Read an insightful treatise by Rachel Brown regarding Telemann’s 12 Fantasias here.

Statuesque Toronto

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Curly & his Bagpipes 2

I love capturing the flavour of Toronto streetscapes as you can hear in this second soundfile of street busking from the intersection of Queen & Uni during my wanders downtown the other day.

After connecting with Curly (who I am convinced is actually undercover, you know, like Huggy Bear from Starsky and Hutch) and J-walking across University back to my parked car, I happened to glance up – what an image, and how could I not share this with you!?

Busking for Change

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Curly & his Persian Pipes

You know that spring is in the air when the sound of buskers can be heard on Toronto’s city street corners.

It’s actually been a kind winter for playing out on the street, and I have regularly heard the sound of Curly’s masterful piping almost weekly these past few months. One of his fav haunts is just across from the splendid and still kinda new Four Seasons ballet and opera house. As it turns out, the north-east corner of University and Queen is a hot spot for playing, where from one day to the next you might hear saxophone, classical guitar, or even bagpipes as featured here in this street-level recording.

If you find yourself near Queen and Uni, perhaps take a moment to enjoy the music…and be sure to pay the piper!

For those of you in the Montreal area, today is a massive day for busking – 29 musicians will be raising money for War Child Canada. Last year’s Busking for Change event raised over $100,000 in aid of children affected by war.

Here’s more info that tells you about the musicians involved and how to donate – you don’t have to be in Montreal to throw some coin into these buskers’ instrument cases as they support children in need around the world!

In the Queen’s Chambers

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Duo for Violin & Flute

Welcome to the Royal Suite located high in Toronto’s venerable Royal York Hotel.

Recently I received a welcome invitation to provide some background music for an intimate reception organized by the St. Georges Society of Toronto, Canada’s oldest charitable organization.

I was excited to learn that not only was the event to be held in the historic Royal York, but in what’s called the Royal Suite where royalty actually reside when visiting Toronto as they tour the Commonwealth – how cool is that?

So I asked my Max, my violinist friend from Urban Flute Ensemble, to join me and he and I had a great time playing through a variety of duos with animated conversation serving as a backdrop. The St. George’s Valentine’s Day reception was a thoroughly delightful experience!

I love providing background music, and have been amazed at some of the incredible worlds that have opened before me as a freelance musician – having a chance to play for this prestigious organization in the ‘Queen’s Chambers’ ranks right up there!

To learn more about the St. Georges Society of Toronto or to make a donation, click here.

Bull’s-Eye for Bouillabaisse

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The Sound of Music, Overture

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From the outside, I have to admit that this sports dome looked rather unremarkable; however as I entered through the air-sealed revolving doors, my 7-iron in hand, and walked out onto the lush astroturf, I was immediately captivated and felt like I had discovered a Garden of Eden or some forgotten, urban Paradise!

Urban Flute Project from the outset has been laced with serendipitous events, chance meetings and bizarre connects that leave me scratching my head at times. In this case, based totally on a random conversation in a local restaurant, I was introduced to this phenomenal golfing center in Toronto’s east end, out where St. Clair and Bloor collide, and am happy to report that I now have a team of golf pros to help me improve my game!

As I explain further, don’t get me wrong: I love my local watering holes – The Duke of York on Prince Arthur, for example, or The Pour House up on Dupont – you know, for grabbing a beer along with some utilitarian pub fare.

But nothing compares to Le Paradis Brasserie and Bistro just a few steps further up Bedford Road for its superb French cuisine and extraordinary, personable service. We’re talking white linen treatment here, and a bill for soup and a cold one – get this – even including a generous tip, that is less than the same fare at either pub pre-tip, so go figure!

I guess that’s why Le Paradis is packed to the rafters on a regular basis.

Personally, I like perching at the bar near the entrance, in part to watch the comings and goings of the wait staff, as well as to see customers as they arrive and wait briefly to be seated. So it was a couple of weeks ago that I found myself settling into my bouillabaisse, fresh bread and a Stella when presently a trio arrived and assembled themselves around the corner of the dark wood bar adjacent to me.

It turns out that this family manage one of Toronto’s finest golf domes, offering a driving range with targets to aim for as well as informal coaching for golfers of all levels – if only they had this kind of space for musicians, you know, where you could drop by to practice for 20 minutes, and maybe get a pro to offer a few pointers – how cool would that be?

On par with the friendly welcome one gets visiting Toronto City Sports Centre, I would hazard (sorry, golf jokes!) to say that, besides offering excellent value, Le Paradis is remarkable for the atmosphere that they’ve created – just walking in through the doors one is ushered into another world – the aromas that emanate enticingly from the kitchen and fill the air intermingle with a distinct sense of bon vivante. For a singular French dining experience, you owe it to yourself to drop by Le Paradis, located just north of Davenport on the west side of Bedford.

And if you’re looking for some fine golfing, head to Toronto City Golf where you can work your way through a pyramid of balls for just $12. Like the French service offered at Le Paradis, this is a magical, inviting space to work on your game, especially in the off-season. And besides, like impersonal service and paper napkins at the local pubs, why settle for anything less? As compared to hitting some old bucket of balls at some old hackneyed driving range – check out the civilized, carefully stacked pyramids of golf balls in the picture above – well that’s just so, how would you say, declasse!

Not the first time thatI’ve recorded in a sports dome, here’s the sound of my whacking a few balls before switching over to my flute

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– and yes, I hit the suspended bull’s-eye 2 out of 3 shots when I turned my sights in that direction! Imagine these two soundfiles overlaid as I ‘aim’ my notes out into this fantastic space!

Serenade Under Pottery Road Bridge

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Pottery Road Serenade

Yes, believe it or not, this is a picture I took in downtown Toronto, just up along Bayview Avenue from the fabulous Evergreen transformation of the historic Brick Works site.

With the incessant sound of traffic swirling overhead, I recently recorded in one of my favorite spots in the city, playing my flute under the Pottery Road Bridge down in the Don Valley. Juxtaposed with the gritty, urban graffiti and the cooing of pigeons nesting in the girders, this classic war-time song seemed well suited given the sweet nostalgia of the melody…I guess we could rename this (There’ll Be Pigeons Over) The White Cliffs of Dover!

In this rendition, I pop up and down the octave to best play with the acoustic space that the water, concrete and graffiti afforded me.

To learn more about the revitalization of the Don River, check out Don Watcher.

Here’s the space where I recorded…

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…and here’s a detail of the artwork I discovered there beside the Don:

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Allmark Automotive

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Melancolique, Laszlo Lajtha

Prepare yourself for a sonic feast here. Not the first time I’ve recorded in an automotive shop, the nuance of extraneous sounds that accompany this exquisite flute solo by Laszlo Lajtha appears almost orchestrated at times, and in this regard is truly mystifying – the layers of sound are even stunning, especially towards the end.

My friend Johanness has learned to put up with my idiosyncrasies and knows the drill, so to speak, as I gamely play at being Grease Monkey* alongside him, taking breaks once in a while to jam out on my flute. So he was happy enough to put up with me giving this fav piece of mine a read-through while he tinkered away, truing my wheels and putting on my winter tires just as the snow began to fly outside.

I hadn’t realized that Lajtha was a close colleague of Bartok and Kodaly – learning alongside you here!

Sure, friends raise an eyebrow querulously when I mention that I drive all the way to Newmarket to get my car serviced, but a mechanic you can heed is a friend indeed…or something like that. You can find Allmark Automotive (905-478-1011) just north of Newmarket on Leslie Street in Queensville – just tell Johanness that Urban Flute sent you.

Oh, and almost forgot to mention – while you’re in the area, be sure to check out the incredible Sharon Temple just down the road. It was back when I was looking for this architectural gem in the summer of ’08  that Johanness and I first chanced to meet.

What can I say, it’s worth the drive to Newmarket!

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* And for a little more Jeff Beck, check out My Thing.

Classic Infiltration: Insane Acoustics

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Caprice en Gigue, Bodinus

Talk about your classic urban infiltration, here’s the third of three recordings from the hauntingly deserted Downsview hangars. Once again, my thanks to ArcticLamb for the terrific photos (while my camera is in for repairs) as well as for his camaraderie and shared sense of adventure! While AL snapped away, I set up to record with my flute, all the while keeping a wary eye and ear open for any approaching security.

My gratitude as well for the kind offer of a lift up the Allan Expressway on a cold winter afternoon – if you venture up that way, you can dump your car at the nearby Idomo parking lot, though you don’t actually need a car to get there – there’s a TTC station right across the snowy field from the hangars.

Currently listed as a Grade 8 piece in the RCM Syllabus, this charming work for solo flute by Sebastian Bodinus seemed well-suited for some classic infiltration! Recording it in one take, huddled as I was behind a discarded pile of pink insulation, would bode well for the glorious acoustics of the huge interior space…withe cascading arpeggiated passages reverberating off the high, vaulted ceiling, I wasn’t disappointed!

Toying with the idea of venturing further through the series of massive, interconnected series of hangars and shivering with the cold and adrenaline, we talked it through and quickly agreed: dealing with security or police was one thing, but messing with the military was something yet again. I don’t know, I guess we were undetected as we respectfully tiptoed along the perimeter of this intriguing room, but, call me paranoid, I had the unnerving sensation that some sniper might be training his scopes on me as I played, or that a black-clad members of a SWAT team would suddenly descend from the  overhead skylights- yet again risking my life for Art!?

So we retraced our steps and got the hec out of there, perhaps to return another day.

Note: In reading a bit about Bodinus on good ol’ Wikipedia, there’s both good news and bad. It is quoted that, writing in a late Baroque style, he was a “minor master [who] appears to have written first-rate music.” That’s the good news. The not so good news is that in his latter years he became disoriented and was sent off to an insane asylum.

Insane music for an insane adventure at these historic hangars.